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About

Julian Bass is researching how communities adapt and use digital technologies. He has published findings in ICT for International Development, agile software development methodologies and socio-technical systems engineering (See Citation List).

 

Dr Bass is a Senior Lecturer (Associate Professor) at University of Salford, Co-Chair of the IFIP Working Group Conference on the Social Implications of Computers in Developing Countries, Yogyakarta, Indonesia, 2017 and a Senior Editor of the Electronic Journal of Information Systems in Developing Countries (EJISDC).

Bio

Julian was formerly secretary of the IFIP Working Group on the Social Implications of Computers in Developing Countries.

Previously Dr Bass was the Higher Education IT Advisor at the Higher Education Strategy Centre (an agency of the Ministry of Education) in Ethiopia.

He co-authored and edited the national Computing Guidance Notes and Benchmark document now in use in the country.

orcid.org/0000-0002-0570-7086

 

Multi-casting in Mountainous Regions of Developing Countries: Analysis through ICT, Institutions, and Capabilities Perspectives

Overcoming shortages of teachers or teachers with required skills and experience is a major challenge in rural schools in the global south. We investigate a classroom video conference multi-casting project under development by the Nepal Wireless Networking Project. Our case study draws on one-to-one interviews and focus group discussions from three areas and 10 village research sites in Nepal. An analytical framework which combines the capability approach, institutions theory and ICTs is used. We found that multi-casting projects in the health domain (eHealth projects) focus on capacity building for rural health workers. Despite concerns about the quality of health outreach workers, they were central to eHealth project design. In contrast, teachers were not afforded such a central role in the classroom multi-casting project. Teachers were being sidelined or replaced, rather than being seen as an essential asset to the project. The main contribution of this paper is to enhance understanding of how multi-casting projects can enable or inhibit educational capabilities with regard to health and education in mountainous regions of developing countries.

 

The full text of the paper is available here

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